" alt="">

Smart Questions to Ask an Interviewer

05.10.2022

Smart Questions to Ask an Interviewer

Last month I spoke about questions to avoid asking in an interview. One of the most neglected aspects of interview success, this month, I’m exploring the questions that will give you the upper hand and help you stand out from the crowd.

When it comes to the end of an interview, the best approach is to ask four or five thoughtful questions that demonstrate you are serious about the role, have done your homework, and are someone who is proactive and will add value to the team.

While it is important to keep your eye on the clock, so you don’t overrun, you need to take the opportunity to impress with a series of smart, considerate, and well-researched questions or comments.

When pre-planning, it pays to consider your motivations. Whether it’s the company culture, professional development, or their approach to sustainability, the answers you get should help you to decide if the job and organisation are a good fit for you.

Learn more about the people interviewing you:

  • Why did you decide to work for the organisation?
  • What is your favourite part about working here?
  • What excites you about the future of this company?
  • What do you believe is necessary to succeed at the company?
  • What are some of the company’s recent accomplishments?

Find out all you can about the role, making sure questions cover new ground:

  • What are the first projects I’ll be working on?
  • What are the most challenging aspects of this job?
  • Are there any functions not mentioned in the job description?
  • Do you expect any change to the role in the future?
  • What training can I expect in my first week?

Look for a company culture that aligns with your values:

  • Are there ambitious growth plans for the next few years?
  • How has the company changed over recent years?
  • How would you describe the culture of the office?
  • Does the business help staff achieve a healthy work-life balance?
  • Is there any volunteering or charitable service opportunities?

Training and development should be tied to personal career goals:

  • How will my performance be measured?
  • What do you hope I will achieve in the six months here?
  • Is there support for professional development in this role?
  • Does the role have a planned path for future advancement?
  • When I have settled into the role, what opportunities are there for career growth?

The people you work with will have a big impact on your success and happiness:

  • Can you tell me about the team I’ll be part of?
  • What other departments will I work closely with?
  • What are your biggest concerns about the team right now?
  • How does the team contribute to the overall success of the business?
  • Does anyone on the team get together outside of work?

An interview is a two-way process. With the knowledge gained in preparation, you should be ready to ask a selection of questions that not only interest you but show you are aware of the challenges and opportunities you will face in the new role.

The further along in the hiring process you are, the more crucial this becomes. Try to match the questions to the people you are speaking with and pitch the level accordingly.

Ultimately, businesses want to work with candidates who go above and beyond the basic requirements. By asking questions that show you fit that description, not only will you impress the interviewer, but it can also mean the difference between being offered the job and not.

08.11.2022

The Workplace is Changing… Again.

COVID not only changed the way we work, but it also altered the balance of power in…

Read Article

06.09.2022

Be Careful What You Ask

When helping somebody to find a new job, I offer market and salary advice and support them…

Read Article

01.08.2022

I Feel the Need, The Need for Speed.

Inspiration can arise from anywhere. It could be a place you visit, someone you meet or, more…

Read Article